2014 USA 3x3 National Championship
Colorado Springs, Colo.
May 9-11
2014 USA 3x3 National Championship
Colorado Springs, Colo.
May 9-11

Road Warriors

Aug. 10, 2011• Shenzhen, China

Most people look at a cross-country flight as a long travel day. That doesn’t even come close to what the 2011 USA Basketball World University Games Teams did over almost a 30-hour span. After beginning to load their respective buses from the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo., at 4:30 a.m. (MDT) on Mon., Aug. 8, the men’s and women’s teams rolled out of town and up to Denver.

Following a short delay, the squads flew to San Francisco and then onto Hong Kong. By the time everyone landed in China, the travel day was already about 24 hours long … and counting. After gathering along with several swimmers outside customs, everyone went through a special “Universiade” passport control lane, gathered luggage and then walked through another special customs lane dedicated to the event participants.

Then it was time for a bus ride to the border, where everyone off-loaded the buses, went through another customs control area to leave the Hong Kong territory and about 50 yards later, pushed bags through customs at the official mainland China boarder. Then it was onto the third bus of the day and a short while later the World University Games village loomed large in the distance.

Again the teams unloaded their buses, dragged the bags off, got a brief introduction by U.S. delegation members, and then finally made their way to their home away from home for the next few weeks.

From door-to-door the process lasted just under 30 hours. With no complaints. Everyone, bleary-eyed from getting just a few hours here and there on the plane, was very excited about the prospect of living in a village with thousands of other athletes from the U.S. and around the world.

“I think someone said the name of the day was ‘patience,’ said University of Notre Dame guard Natalie Novosel. “You never know what you’re going to experience with the travel. It’s always unexpected so you just have to go with the flow. Once somebody to get irritable, it’s easy for a lot of people to get irritable. So everyone was trying to keep a good attitude about it and everyone did the best they could. Overall I think everyone did have a good attitude, a good experience and we made it here safely and that’s the biggest thing.”

The next 24 hours were just as much of a whirlwind and this is where the two teams' paths went separate ways to accommodate their different practice schedules. The USA women, after getting into the dining hall around midnight, met again for breakfast at 9:00 a.m., then went to a delegation briefing at 10:00 a.m., met for lunch at 1:00 p.m., went straight to a press conference that put them back at the village about 3:30 p.m., then got taped an hour later and headed off for a scrimmage against Brazil at 5:35 p.m.

Following the scrimmage, the team returned ‘home,’ turned in their practice gear, went to dinner and made it back in time to Skype, instant message and email their family and friends back home before sleep took over and sent them into dreamland for their second night in the village.

“I thought (the scrimmage against Brazil) was really good,” said USC grad student Jacki Gemelos. “It was a really good test for us to lead us into the actual game on Sunday morning. It was a good day to kind of get the airplane out of our system and things like that. They were a pretty good team and I think we did really well tonight. We were rusty and tired and things like that, but it’s definitely going to prepare us for Sunday morning.”

Any normal person might look at a schedule like that and have a few comments about it taking too long, being tired, having not a lot of free time, etc., but not the members of this team. Everyone is very excited about the experience looming ahead of them – and not just because of the basketball competition. There are too many cultures to explore, experiences to be had and lifelong friendships to forge for the USA Basketball coaches and athletes to be anything but excited.

“The athletes’ village has so many different cultures,” stated first generation Nigerian-American and Stanford University sophomore Chiney Ogwumike. “You see and meet people from around the world that you would never get to meet, who are also top-tier athletes and great people. The village is just great, food-wise, service-wise. The people of Shenzhen have been way over hospitable. I really enjoy the village and I couldn’t imagine a better experience, coming to the World University Games.”

The USA squad still has a few days to get acclimated, practice and prepare for its opening tip-off against Brazil on Aug. 14 at 10:00 a.m. (Aug. 13 @ 10 p.m. ET) and in addition to practicing, the team’s itinerary includes Opening Ceremonies, shopping and getting to know more people from around the world.

“It was great to see them back on the court and get basketball back on their mind after all the meetings and the obligatory things that you have to do,” said USA and Iowa State University head coach Bill Fennelly. “Now it’s time to start getting ready and hopefully be real excited come Sunday morning.”

“I think we’re all a little off of our sleeping time,” added University of Tennessee guard/forward Shekinna Stricklen. “Once we get adjusted to the time and get used to things, we’re going to be getting around and seeing more places.”

USA Basketball.com caught up with a few team members following the scrimmage, which the USA won by a lopsided 79-47 margin, to find out their thoughts about the travel day and everything else they’ve experienced over the last 48 hours.

Bill Fennelly, USA head coach (Iowa State)
Were you surprised at how you played against Brazil?
Certainly these practices aren’t as serious as the actual competition and the game will be much different (against Brazil) on Sunday. It was good for us to play. We’ve been traveling a lot and this is the first time we’ve gotten out and played basketball in about three days. It was good for us tonight to get out there and get moving.

Was it good to get the team out and get their legs moving?
It was much needed. It seems like a long time since we left Colorado Springs. So, it was good. I thought that everyone played pretty hard. Certainly there were some timing issues and things like that that you worry about. But, it was great to see them back on the court and get basketball back on their mind after all the meetings and the obligatory things that you have to do. Now it’s time to start getting ready and hopefully be real excited come Sunday morning.

What are your impressions about what you’ve seen so far?
We’ve been very, very impressed. The people are fantastic. It’s a beautiful city. The village is great. This is our first time in any basketball facility and it’s been very organized and the people have been very helpful. I’ve been very, very impressed. It’s been very similar to what we see at home.  

What do you know about the Chinese basketball team?
This is my first time in China. I have not seen a lot of the Chinese teams play. I know Yao Ming, of course, but I have not seen many of the current players yet. We’ll see them in the tournament. I’m sure they’re very, very good and I’m looking forward to playing the home country.

Jacki Gemelos

Jacki Gemelos (University of Southern California)
What was it like, getting out on the court against other international competition?
I thought it was really good. It was a really good test for us to lead us into the actual game on Sunday morning. It was a good day to kind of get the airplane out of our system and things like that. They were a pretty good team and I think we did really well tonight. We were rusty and tired and things like that, but it’s definitely going to prepare us for Sunday morning.

Realizing you’ve only been here about 24 hours, can you describe what life is like in the atheltes’ village?
I think it’s awesome. They’ve done a great job with the facilities and what-not. The food’s great. The people are so nice, you couldn’t ask for better hospitality. This village and this area is perfect for the World University Games.

Is there another team, country or sport you’re looking forward to going to watch?
I don’t know if Greece is here or not, I haven’t seen them yet, but if they are that would be amazing to go check any of their events out. I would really like to see the men’s soccer events and track & field. That would be really cool. But, as far as specific teams, if Greece is here I would love to go see them.

Is your family Greek?
Yeah, my dad is full-blooded Greek, born and raised. Not my mom, but I was pretty much born in the Greek community and raised as Greek Orthodox.

On our way out to the scrimmage, a USA Volleyball team member said hi to you. Was he from USC also?
Yeah, there are a couple guys from USC playing on the men’s USA team, which is really cool. I kind of knew, but not really and it was kind of surprising when I saw them. But it was really cool.

Natalie Novosel

Natalie Novosel (University of Notre Dame)
What was it like, getting out on the court against other international competition?
For our first time, it was definitely exciting for me. I was happy to get out there and just go at it, especially for our first game. We were a little sore, a little tired the first part of it. Other than that, it was great. The time difference did affect us a little bit. I think we were a little tired, a little groggy, but once it came down to it, we were here. We were ready to play once we stepped out on the court.

Realizing you’ve only been here about 24 hours, can you describe what life is like in the atheltes’ village?
Trying to get adjusted as we can, it’s hard to not get caught up in the excitement of everything. The bright lights are everywhere. We’re getting new gear, new clothes, left and right. It’s just an exciting experience.

Have you had any interactions with other teams?
We’re trying to see if we can find the tallest guy or the biggest guy from another country. So far we’re at 212 (6’11.5”), but I’m not sure even what that really means. I think it’s about seven feet. He was a volleyball player from Brazil.

Are you playing “guess the sport?” when you see other athletes?
No, our first questions to them are just ‘what do you play?’ and ‘how tall are you?’ other than that, no.

Describe your travel day:
I think someone said the name of the day was ‘patience.’ You never know what you’re going to experience with the travel. It’s always unexpected so you just have to go with the flow. Once somebody to get irritable, it’s easy for a lot of people to get irritable. So everyone was trying to keep a good attitude about it and everyone did the best they could. Overall I think everyone did have a good attitude, a good experience and we made it here safely and that’s the biggest thing.

Aside from trying to win a gold medal, what are you most looking forward to during the World University Games?
Soaking up every second of it in. I have personally never experienced something like this before. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and I’m really taking that to heart and taking it all in.

Chiney Ogwumike

Chiney Ogwumike (Stanford University)
What was it like, getting out on the court against other international competition?
It was great. It was a nice opportunity to get the kinks out, to finally get loose because we had a long travel. We’re just here trying to get acclimated, so being able to finally hit the floor after seeing so many athletes from so many countries is really great. We were motivated. It was fun.

Were you familiar with any of their players, did you play against any of them at the 2010 FIBA Americas U18 Championship?
Coming from the U18 team last year, I was familiar with some of their players and their style. But, it’s a completely different team that we have right now at this event. So it was a different experience. Overall I liked our energy. We got better with every play and every possession and that’s what we’re looking for as we practice.

Take me through your travel day to get China:
The travel, being able to be with the team helps you so much because we rely on each other for energy, entertainment and relaxation. We were just sitting together, bonding as a team, having good conversations and watching TV. We were also very excited about where we were going. Even though it was tiring, we’re fighting the jet lag. We’re finally starting to adjust and we’re happy to be here right now.

Realizing you’ve only been here about 24 hours, can you describe what life is like in the atheltes’ village?
It’s been fantastic. The athletes’ village has so many different cultures. You see and meet people from around the world that you would never get to meet, who are also top-tier athletes and great people. The village is just great, food-wise, service-wise. The people of Shenzhen have been way over hospitable. I really enjoy the village and I couldn’t imagine a better experience, coming to the World University Games.

Is there another team, country or sport you’re looking forward to going to watch?
Yeah, I definitely am trying to follow the Stanford people, the swimmers. I know some people who are swimming here, so hopefully I get to go see them compete. Besides that, USA athletes, trying to see as many sports as we can, the different ones, the obscure ones, the mainstream ones and obviously our men’s (basketball) team, hopefully we can catch them, too. USA and Stanford, I’m hoping to watch them all.

Shekinna Stricklen

Shekinna Stricklen (University of Tennessee)
What was it like, getting out on the court against other international competition?
It felt good. I think we’re all excited. We kind of started off a little slow, but once we got going and got the feel of how it goes and playing on this court, we picked it up.

Take me through your first day in China and how you felt after the long day of travel:
It was crazy! Everyone was kind of still tired. Everyone’s legs were still tired and tight. But we enjoyed it. It was a long flight, but once we got here everyone was really happy and excited.

What are your thoughts on the athletes’ village?
You know? I really like the village. Everything’s fresh, clean. The beds are so comfortable. Everyone’s treating us so nice here. It’s great.

Have you interacted with any other athletes?
We have with a couple of soccer teams. They’re very nice. They said they like it here. They’re very excited. We’re going to meet a lot more people, though.

Are you looking forward to getting acclimated to the time and diving into everything that’s offered here off the court?
Yes, especially the time! I think we’re all a little off of our sleeping time. Once we get adjusted to the time and get used to things, we’re going to be getting around and seeing more places. Everything will be alright.