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The Jump Hook

  • Date:
    Oct 7, 2010

The jump hook is a very effective shot near the basket, particularly when a taller player is guarding you.

The technically sound movement pattern for the jump hook is exactly the same as for the jump shot, except for the relationship of the body to the basket. In the jump shot, your shoulders and body are square to the basket. In the jump hook, you protect the ball by keeping your body and non-shooting arm directly between the ball and the opponent guarding you.

Here are some tips for establishing a solid jump hook.

Getting Set

Getting set for the jump hook is similar to the basic jump shot. Stand two or three feet directly in front of the basket.

Once set, rotate your body 90 degrees so that the shoulder of the non-shooting arm is pointing directly at the basket. While rotating the body, slide the non-shooting hand along the surface of the ball so that it ends up directly between the basket and the ball. The shooting hand continues to face the basket. If you are shooting with your right hand, your forearm should be vertical and the ball should be directly over your right shoulder. To make yourself as tall as possible, your shooting arm should be fully extended, with only a slight bend at the elbow. This is the stance for the jump hook.

Shooting

Once set for the jump hook, jump and shoot. To protect the ball, keep the non-shooting hand fully extended, until the ball is well on its way to the basket. Learn to shoot the jump hook with either hand.

After shooting from a stationary position, work on shooting by stepping on to your non-pivot foot and raising your pivot foot off the floor (see my tip the Stride Stop Layup in the shooting category). For example, if you want to shoot a jump hook with your right hand, then establish your left foot as the non-pivot foot. Then, take a step with it, jumping vertically and shooting as you complete the step. To avoid traveling, make sure your non-pivot foot does not come down to floor until after the ball leaves your hand.

To practice the jump hook with a step-in, do the following. On the left side of the basket, stand at a 45-degree angle to the backboard about 4 or 5 ft. from the basket. Get set to shoot the basic jump shot. Instead of shooting the jump shot, step into the paint with your left foot on a line that is parallel to the baseline. As your left comes to floor, execute the jump hook.

Return to the starting position. Get set. Then step with your right foot toward the baseline on a line that is parallel to the sideline. Execute the jump hook with your left hand. After several repetitions of each shot, do this exercise from the other side of the hoop.

Practice executing the jump hook after receiving a pass or ending a dribble near the basket from a lay up position on the court. Use the jump hook when your opponent denies you shooting a layup.

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  • Author:
    Tony Fryer
  • Date:
    May 24, 2021

A solid set of footwork techniques helps ensure proper development and, eventually, is a building block for mastering other skills.

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